In any wilderness rescue or loss circumstance, a knife is one of the most important instruments. The reason is that a knife is likely the one tool you can utilize for numerous survival tasks. 

In extreme situations, it might even be the tool you use to kill and prepare your food. In addition to being used for activities like cutting materials or carving wood, a knife can also be used as a weapon to build a shelter, defend oneself from predators and help spark tinder to start a fire. 

In any emergency survival circumstance, knowing how to make a knife is a useful ability to have. You should learn how to construct a survival knife out of stone even if you are the most self-sufficient, experienced prepper possible so you can create this tool should a survival crisis require it.

Method to Make a Knife in the Wild

How to Make Knife in the Wild? The first step is to acquire the materials you will need to construct a knife since having a knife, even a temporary one, is a good idea. Once you have them, you can begin the process of giving your knife a keen edge.

Step 1: Search Area for Ideal Stones

A stone is necessary as a foundational element. Stones suitable for producing blades are not common in many regions. To find the best rocks, search your nearby areas. 

Certain places are rich in rocks while others are not; it can be time consuming to find proper stones to construct your survival knives, so do some study on the area you’re heading to.

Searching for stone for your survival knife requires patience. Caves, cliffs, beaches, creek beds, and other similar locations are where people frequently look for rocks.

Step 2: Locate Durable Rocks for the Blade

For making the blade, it would be best if you had a rock that was large enough, about the size of a small melon, with a flat or concave side. This is because most relatively large rocks have a weathered outer surface called the cortex, and the larger the stone, the higher quality of the material that lies beneath it.

If the rock produces a ringing or similar sound when you clack them together, that is a good indication that it is an excellent material for the blade. Some of the best stones for making blades include flint, chalcedony and obsidian.

How to Make Knife in the Wild

Step 3: Find a Hammer Stone

Find a hammerstone with a rounded surface about the size of a huge egg; you will employ it as a hammer to smash the stone to create the blade.

Step 4: Strike the Rocks

It’s crucial to grip each stone appropriately before beginning to strike it against the other. If you don’t, you’ll either be unable to remove anything or hit your fingers, which will surely be quite painful. Use the hammerstone to strike the rock’s edge while resting on your thigh.

Holding the blade stone firmly in the palm of your weaker hand should be your first course of action. In other words, if you are left-handed, hold it in your right hand, and vice versa. Assuming the hammer stone is in your stronger hand, strike the other stone at a 45-degree angle. Smack till you remove a stone flake.

Step 5: Shape the Blade

With time, a sharp edge should form on the weaker stone as this should begin to chip away at its edges. When you finish this striking process, the blade stone will have a sharp edge on two-thirds of it. The huge blades are made out of big rock sizes.

Step 6: Handle

If all the steps have been followed, there should be enough of the original stone left behind to rub against while using the harder stone to create a smooth grip for your knife.

How to Use a Stone Knife

Use a stone knife with caution. Slicing motions should be pulled while holding the stone knife close to your body. The delicate edge will be shielded from breaking and chipping as a result.

Alternative to the Stone Knife

If you live in a place without the availability of flint or obsidian, you might want to explore utilizing slate instead; the stone is ground to make blades.

Something is Better Than Nothing

How to Make Knife in the Wild? Although it cannot completely replace a decent survival knife, it can be quite helpful in an emergency. Use it for all cutting tasks. Even if the stone knife is inferior to any kitchen knife you might buy at the shop; it is still an improvement over nothing.